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5 days ago

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Twin Cities Polish Festival shared Polish American Cultural Institute of Minnesota (PACIM)'s post. ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

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Twin Cities Polish Festival shared Learn Polish Daily's photo.

Na zawsze Polska

Sto Lat
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Today is Polish National Independence Day, which is the most important Polish national holiday. Today we commemorate the anniversary of the restoration of Poland's sovereignty as the Second Polish Republic in 1918, after 123 years of partitions. In 1918, November 11, general Piłsudski assumed control of Poland. This event was a symbol of the beginning of II Republic of Poland. Borders and political system was shaped in 1921. To commemorate the beginning of independent Poland in 1937, November 11 was proclaimed as a national holiday. The date corresponds to the date of other countries' Remembrance Day, Armistice Day, or Veterans Day. All of these holidays and Polish Independence Day are indirectly related because they all emerged from the circumstances at the end of World War I. In other countries, holidays were established in the spirit of grief and horror at the enormous human cost of the war, and they mark the sacrifices of those who fought. For Poland, however, the tragedy of the war was tempered by what had been accomplished at its end: the restoration of a sovereign Polish state that had been lost entirely in the partitions of Poland, after 123 years of struggle.The Polish holiday is therefore simultaneously a celebration of the reemergence of a Polish state and a commemoration of those who fought for it. Crucial to restoring independence was the defeat in the war of all three of the occupying powers. Russia was plunged into the confusion of revolution and civil war, Austria-Hungary disintegrated and went into decline, and the German Reich bowed to pressure from the forces of the Entente. For Poles, this was a unique opportunity to reclaim their independence. Following the defeat of the occupying forces, the Poles seized military and civil power, building the foundations of their future state. On October 28, 1918 the Polish Liquidation Commission was formed in Kraków. The Commission seized power from the Austrians in Galicia and Cieszyn Silesia. A few days later they succeeded in disarming the Austrian forces using members of the secret Polish Military Organisation as well as legionnaires and young people. On the nights of 6 and 7 November the Provisional Government of the People's Republic of Poland was formed in Lublin under the supervision of Ignacy Daszyński. The government was made up of representatives from the Polish Socialist Party (PPS), the Polish Social Democratic Party (PPSD) and the Polish People's Party "Wyzwolenie" (Liberation). At the same time the Government troops disarmed the occupying forces in Lubelszczyzna and Kielecczyzna. It was at this point that the country's future head of state, Józef Piłsudski, returned to Poland after incarceration by the Germans. His 10 November arrival in Warsaw was enthusiastically met by the population of the capital and saw the mass disarmament of the occupying forces across the whole of Poland. Piłsudski assumed authority on 11 November, forming a new centralized government and soon calling parliamentary elections.

1 week ago

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Matt JacksonMaciek Skorupski !

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November 16, 2017 - Give to the Max Day

Donate to the Twin Cities Polish Festival - help maintain this a s a free festival!

your donation will support this authentic Polish cultural festival and help us bring a wide array of world-class entertainment - Folk Dancers & Musicians, Artists, Singers, Polka Bands, Classical Musicians and Contemporary Polish Music - to the 2018 Festival. Your donation also covers artistic grants to the artists, visual, musical, etc. Additional festival information and donation information can also be made on the www.tcpolishfestival.org website.

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2 weeks ago

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Twin Cities Polish Festival shared poloniahsv's post. ... See MoreSee Less

Today, 1 November, in history in Poland: Born in 1526 - Catherine Jagiellon (Polish: Katarzyna Jagiellonka; Swedish: Katarina Jagellonica, Lithuanian: Kotryna Jogailatė; 1 November 1526 – 16 September 1583) a Polish princess and the wife of John III of Sweden. As such, she was Duchess of Finland (1562–83), Queen of Sweden (1569–83), and Grand Princess of Finland (1581–83). Catherine had significant influence over state affairs during the reign of her spouse, and negotiated with the pope to introduce a counter reformation in Sweden. Catherine Jagiellon was born in Kraków as the youngest daughter of King Sigismund I the Old of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and his wife Bona Sforza of Milan. Catherine became the spouse of King John III of Sweden and mother of the future Sigismund III Vasa, King of Poland. After the death of her father in 1548, she and her sister Anna moved to Masovia with their mother. After their mother's departure to Italy in 1558, they lived there alone. The sisters were not close to their brother Sigismund II Augustus of Poland. Catherine could reportedly speak Italian and Latin, and was described as more attractive than Anna, and most marriage suggestions were directed toward her. The infusion of Polish blood into the Swedish royal lineage that begun with Catherine would cause considerable strife after her death in the context of the ongoing European wars of religion. Her son Sigismund inherited the thrones of both the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (in 1587) and Sweden (in 1592), but ruled the latter only seven years before being deposed in 1599. Sigismund and his descendants, as Catholic kings, would continue to lay claim to de facto Protestant Sweden over the following century. The succession dispute contributed to the outbreak of several destructive wars until a massive Swedish invasion in the 1650s (known as the Deluge) nearly broke up the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Polish claims to the Swedish throne were finally relinquished in the 1660 Treaty of Oliva. The image of Catherine Jagiellon enjoyed a resurgence in 19th and 20th century Finnish culture and art. John and Catherine were the only Swedish monarchs to reside in the Finnish part of the Swedish realm for any length of time, and their alleged fondness for the land inspired Finnish nationalists. The religious issues that made Catherine unpopular with her contemporaries were by then long obsolete, and it has instead become traditional to depict her as a compassionate and loyal queen. See more at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catherine_Jagiellon

3 weeks ago

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Twin Cities Polish Festival shared Link to Poland's post.

Remembering those who have touched our lives
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1 listopada - wspominamy naszych bliskich, wszystkich znanych i nieznanych, tych którzy odeszli w tym roku... www.linktopoland.com

3 weeks ago

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Twin Cities Polish Festival shared their photo.

Pass the cream cheese please
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And yes the bagel is Polish …. Some stories claim that the bagel was created in the shape of a stirrup to honor King John III Sobieski and his victory over the Turks in the Battle of Vienna in 1683. However, documentation places the bagel in its recognized circular form as early as 1610 in Krakow. It was commonly given to women in childbirth as a gift. The shape was thought to symbolize the eternal cycle of life, with no beginning and no end. The bagel is a dietary staple in Poland, and the word bagel is derived from the Yiddish word “beygal,” meaning “ring” or “bracelet.” The bagel was introduced to the US by immigrant Polish Jews, starting in NY. The Bagel Bakers Local 338 had contracts with all the bagel bakeries in the city, and the bagels were all made by hand. Within the last 50 years, due in a large part through mechanical innovations, allowing for easier creation, bagels have grown in popularity across the US. The bagel has even been in space when NASA astronaut Chamitoff took a batch when he flew to the space station in 2008. Pass the cream cheese please....

3 weeks ago

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A visit from Sw. Mikolaj

Sw. Mikolaj (St. Nicholas) Children’s Reading at PACIM on 12/3/17 at 2 pm

Sw. Mikolaj will read a variety of children stories at PACIM Institute/Library, 43 Main St SE, Minneapolis
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3 weeks ago

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Numerous vendors will be at the PACIM Soup Festival on Sunday 11/5/17 from 3-7 pm at Kolbe Hall, 1630 4th St NE, Minneapolis.

Find your Polish treasure just in time for Christmas
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3 weeks ago

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Twin Cities Polish Festival shared their album.

Autumn in Poland

Polish Autumn - Summer is gone, the winter is approaching but the weather is great and it is time to celebrate and enjoy the colors. The trees are golden and rusty. Polish autumn is truly beautiful and if you have a chance to visit during any of the fall months – do it!
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Autumn in Poland Epic Poland

4 weeks ago

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Come warm your tummy

PACIM Members $10
Non-members $15
Children under 12 - $5

Tickets at door, day of event
First come, first served

Polish vendors will be offering cultural and artisan gifts for purchase - just in time for the holidays
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4 weeks ago

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PNA Lodge #1033, South St. Paul, is hosting a pancake breakfast this Sunday, October 29, from 9 am - 1 pm.

Did you know they have been open since 1883?
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4 weeks ago

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2018 Festival Hours

Friday, August 10:     5:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Saturday, August 11:    10:00 AM - 10:00 PM
Sunday, August 12:    10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

FREE ADMISSION & DOG FRIENDLY
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Twin Cities Polish Festival Location

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43 SE Main St | Minneapolis, Minnesota 55414

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The Twin Cities Polish Festival is a 501(c)3 non profit organization; your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.

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